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Hydroponic Basil

By: Nurul Azis Category: Hydroponic Gardening

hydroponic basil

hydroponic basil

Hydroponic Basil – Basil is one of the most widely-known and healthy herbs, as well as easy to grow. Metaphorically, it transforms ordinary meals into culinary richness. In fact, fresh basil not only tastes better than dried, but it actually tastes unique. So, what about grow your own fresh hydroponically in your kitchen or balcony?

First thing to do, pick type of basil you wish to grow. For basil comes in many different varieties, and each of which have a unique flavor and smell. For example, there is cinnamon basil that smells like sweet spice which also has extraordinarily pretty and fragrant flowers. Or, you can try the most common variety of sweet Genovese Basil (Ocimum basilicum) – the one with broad, rounded leaves. Go get some information and pick one or some that appeal to you.

You can start indoor seeding because basil needs warm air and sun to grow well without risking them get damaged by frost season. If you live in a hot climate, you can start the seeding outside. When you growing basil outdoor, avoid windy and cold spots, because your basil can dry out and die in just one day. You have to water around mid-day so that it has a chance to dry out a little before darkness.

For preparing seed container, avoid planting basil in seed trays/flats for basil will grow a long delicate tap root and need careful care during transplanting to prevent damage. Fill or place the seeds into a moistened propagation cube (for example, rockwool, peat pellet, Jiffy or mixture of equal parts perlite, vermiculite, and peat) into a cell tray filled with seedling potting mix, or directly into a pot with some richer potting mix. You don’t have to sow basil seeds very deeply – just barely cover them.

Press the Hydroponic Basil mixture slightly to remove air pockets. Moist the mixture with water so it will ready to provide the right environment for the basil seeds to germinate. For better yields, you can use a propagator to maintain relative humidity around the seeds or sprouts, keep in medium to high relative humidity. Do not take out the propagator lid until the seedlings are well developed or else dehydration can occur very quickly.

aerogarden basil

aerogarden basil

how to grow hydroponic basil

how to grow hydroponic basil

hydroponic basil growth rate

hydroponic basil growth rate

hydroponic basil nutrients

hydroponic basil nutrients

hydroponic basil ph

hydroponic basil ph

hydroponic basil production

hydroponic basil production

hydroponic cilantro

hydroponic cilantro

hydroponic herbs

hydroponic herbs


Hydroponic Blueberries

By: Nurul Azis Category: Hydroponic Gardening

Hydroponic Blueberries

Hydroponic Blueberries

Hydroponic Blueberries -  A handful of fresh-picked blueberries are so tempting. Also, you can find other delicious creations with this sort of tiny bitty fruits – yoghurt parfait, waffle toppings, baked in pie of muffins, jams, or smoothies. These fruits are very famous with their antioxidant nutrients, which are good for fighting diseases, cancers, and aging.

This berries fruits are easily thriving ornamental shrubs you can find almost everywhere or in any environment. Even more, you can harvest these fruits for a year round as well as for years to come. These fruits are mostly available on May to October season. Out of this season, you can find many dried and frozen alternatives.

You can grow blueberries hydroponically. In fact, there are numerous of varieties, thus their specific growing requirement will be different from one to another. For example, the amount of nutrients needed and the amount of necessary light.  It is better to plant more than one or two plants, so that you have more yields to be harvested. Different varieties with different ripen times can also good choices because you can harvest them all season long.

As the medium, you can choose varied options from sand, water to perlite, as long as it is inert. Put the medium on the hydroponics kit. Immerse the berry roots into the medium and cover the berries with clear plastic dome. Wait until the roots are well established. Give the berries careful sufficient lighting, nutrients, and also appropriate temperature.

A more sunny-spot means more Hydroponic Blueberries can be picked. To increase more yields you can do pruning the blueberry bushes, removing discolored, low growth, dead wood. Safety netting will help you to protect your berries from birds. You can also add mulching – wood chips, leaf mulch or sawdust – to keep the pH low. Lastly, organic fertilizers work best for blueberries.

 

commercial hydroponic blueberries

commercial hydroponic blueberries

growing blueberries greenhouse

growing blueberries greenhouse

growing hydroponic raspberries

growing hydroponic raspberries

hydroponic blackberries

hydroponic blackberries

Hydroponic blueberries ripen in large pots

Hydroponic blueberries ripen in large pots

hydroponic grapes

hydroponic grapes

hydroponic raspberries

hydroponic raspberries

hydroponic strawberries

hydroponic strawberries

 

 

 

 


Hydroponic Carrots

By: Nurul Azis Category: Hydroponic Gardening

hydroponic carrots

hydroponic carrots

Hydroponic Carrots – Carrot is a common name for a native plant to Eurasia and northern Africa and widely distributed throughout the North Temperate Zone. The name also applied to the root of this plant. The cultivated variety is the popular table vegetable. It has the important element of carotene, which is the orange coloring matter of the root, a prolific source of pro-vitamin A.

And you know what? We can grow carrots and other subterranean vegetables hydroponically as well. Hydroponics is not just limited to above soil growth. There are a lot of easy and home-made guides for building your own hydroponic carrot garden.

The simplest one, you will need some preparation like perlite and vermiculite (add to perlite for better water retention) as the medium. Next is a good deep lightproof plastic container with holes at the bottom, at least 12 inches deep and wide. Bigger would be better. You’ll need another plastic container for holding a quantity of water all the time. As an alternative, you can use a deep drip tray (for example, 2 to 3 inches in depth).

After the preparation finished, now you can fill your container with perlite, and also add the vermiculite as well. The ratio is 3:1 for perlite to vermiculite. Put in your carrot seeds in the main container, cover with vermiculite to the depth as written on your seed packet. After that we need to get some water to the seeds to start thus lightly mist or spray the top of your main container with some water. Do not pour water directly down on them at this phase because you will wash away the seeds. You have to keep the top of the main container moist. Maintain the misting as appropriate until the seeds establish themselves. You can consult with the instruction written on your seed packet for germination times.

Once the seeds have germinated – generally carrots take 6 to 10 days to germinate and 2-3 months to mature – you have to give the top of this container a good watering approximately three times a day. Keep the drip tray (or other container) full of water.

As a note, don’t choose a hydroponic system that immerses your Hydroponic Carrots in the water. The reason is that carrots and other root crops don’t do well in very wet environments and keeping them in water all the time will cause them to rot. So you have to keep the liquid level no more than 3 inches deep that still supplies the carrots with access to food and water without making them wet all the time.

aeroponic carrots

aeroponic carrots

hydroponic apples

hydroponic apples

hydroponic carrots perlite

hydroponic carrots perlite

hydroponic carrots yield

hydroponic carrots yield

hydroponic celery

hydroponic celery

hydroponic onions

hydroponic onions

hydroponic potatoes

hydroponic potatoes

perlite

perlite





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